Up to Speed with Our Community

Around campus, we know Gilberth Lobo de Rodríguez as a bright and compassionate host of our coffee tours. His wife, Amalia Rodríguez, is responsible for the fresh smell of our fabrics and shining campus corridors. But behind the family of hardworking farmers, there is even a more intense side to one of their favorite hobbies – running!

cab_2017_755_leisureGilberth and Amalia both finished in medaling positions in their last race, the Fire Mountain Trail. They demonstrate the importance of experience as grandparents in a competition of all ages.

The long display of trophies in the Rodríguez house shows the fruit of practice and repetition – medals won from all around the country, some named with races they have run 10 years in a row. Their running crosses borders from thin forested trails to paved roads, from steep mountains to a yearly race on the beach. With Hilbert’s hopes of running the Boston Marathon, the possibilities show no end.

The UGACR campus depends on locals like Amalia and Gilberth to keep all of our necessities available. Gilberth explains how this hasn’t always been easy: The generation before Gilberth’s grandparents were some of the first groups of people in the upper San Luis area to cultivate coffee. Most of the farmers that lived here would grow coffee, beans, and corn with a focus on subsistence. Families would often take the harvested plants long distances to be able to trade for necessities like medicines, clothes, and textiles.

cab_2017_00710_toursIn the background of this photo you can see a trunk of a coffee tree passed down from Gilberth’s grandfather, cut when it was 65 years old. From the tours, we learn how the cultivation of coffee has evolved in these few generations. By refraining from the use of pesticides and chemicals, the production quantity is reduced on the fincas (farms) around our campus.

This is a logical sacrifice because of the demand for high-quality organic coffee.
cab_2017_00741_toursRetaining these independent ethics means balancing the
relationship with fungus, parasites, and local wildlife, which is a community effort. Like many in the community, Gilberth shares his strong labor on several farms aside from his own.

The workers and visitors at UGA Costa Rica all play a role in the production cycle by creating trade opportunities. The food that we eat either comes from campus or other local fincas. Gilberth sees a beneficial companionship between the two. From his perspective, the university has developed in harmony with the local fincas. The arrival of different nationalities, cultures and customs provided the community with a possibility of beneficial exchanges of experiences and knowledge. Now he sees much of the local youth speaking English.

“Cuando llegan grupos de diferentes nacionalidades, culturas y costumbres, eso permite a algunas familias de la comunidad tener una relación de intercambio, experiencia, y conocimiento.”

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The Rodríguez family is a supercharged example of working hard and playing even harder, waking up early in spite of long hours. They keep their practice strong by maintaining healthful and organized habits that are centered around the family. They continue the tradition of growing coffee in a similar way they pass down the hobby of running to the next generation – theicab_2017_00334_toursr daughter now has seven races under her belt.

Gilberth and Amalia say that the other competitors are often people they are familiar with. They do not see opponents as rivals, but rather as friends to share the experience with. When he gets tired and may slow down, Gilberth thinks of the exhaustion as a common denominator between his friends, that the man behind him may be even more tired himself.

“Cuando me siento cansado yo solamente pienso que los demás también están cansados y posiblemente más que yo. Entonces no hay razón para terminar.”

Racing with this mentality is an exchange that motivates the community. Gilberth and Amalia are more content with the tranquil lifestyle of rural Costa Rica in the San Luis valley. They have relatives scattered in many parts of the country, but enjoy seeing the fruits of their labor in a more direct way. At a finca, you have to be committed to your daily work, but it pays off when you are provided with the ability to immediately quench your hunger and thirst without paper exchange.

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Meeting people like Gilberth and Amalia is what makes a visit to UGACR memorable. It makes an impression to see people who are committed to their trades and hobbies every day, helping to lift up the campus community. This is part of what makes our exchange so rich, that possibly one day the Rodríguez grandson will show his medals to a touring group.

 

 

Photos and words contributed by Photojournalism Intern Charles Austin Boll

A Day in the Life: Resident Naturalist Mac Wing

Rain, Sweat, and Strong Coffee: A Day in the Life of a UGACR Resident Naturalist

UGA Costa Rica Resident Naturalist Mac Wing with a blunt-headed tree snake

My day begins around 5 am, when I hear monkeys above my cabin. They’re strictly diurnal, so that sound means the sun is up. I pull on my clothes, rain boots, and grab a flashlight and camera. I may be gone for the whole day, so it’s good to be prepared for anything.

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Preserving history in San Luis

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Ana Ligia López Jurado, Lindsay Stallcup, Dallas Fitzgibbon, and Samantha Peykoff stand in front of the beneficio, or coffee processing plant, in San Luis that Ramón Brenes built.

Yesterday, at a special community presentation about the history of San Luis, UGACR students Dallas Fiztgibbon and Samantha Peykoff debuted a 50-minute documentary they have worked on throughout the semester for Spanish 4090, a service-learning class.

Along with their professors, Ana Ligia López Jurado and Lindsay Stallcup, they conducted interviews about Ramon Brenes, an important figure in this town’s history because of his business acumen and character. Both his daughter, Mari Brenes Jiménez, and his grandson, Ramón “Mon” Brenes Morales, shared their memories with us and graciously invited us into their homes.

Special thanks also goes to many others who contributed to this project: Víctor Ramírez Badilla, Carlos Badilla Jiménez, Odilio Ramírez Rodríguez, Tina Brenes Jiménez, Danis Brenes Jiménez, Luis Venegas Pérez, Edwin Rojas Quesada, Orietta Gómez Chen, and Manfreed Venegas Brenes.

The student’s knowledge of Spanish was put to the test as they edited about 12 hours of interviews. In the end, they had a polished documentary to present to the people of San Luis and demonstrated how important it is to preserve history and our stories.

Wednesday Spotlight: Dr. Kris Irwin, Adelante Award Winner

The UGA Costa Rica Adelante Award honors a UGA faculty or staff member who has made major contributions to the University of Georgia’s Campus in Costa Rica.  These contributions may have come in any of the following areas:

  • Study abroad program development and on-going instruction on study abroad programs with particular attention to student mentoring and service-learning;
  • Incorporation of international content from Costa Rica into the curriculum in his or her field;
  • Cevelopment of ongoing research initiatives based at UGA Costa Rica;
  • Significant contributions to develop the UGA Costa Rica Campus infrastructure;
  • Significant contributions toward ecological and social sustainability of the UGA Costa Rica Campus;
  • Public service and outreach in the San Luis / Monteverde community;
  • Leading international conferences and symposia based at the UGA Costa Rica Campus;
  • Significant contributions to the Latino community in and around the Athens community;
  • Commitment to fostering relationships, educational or otherwise, between the Athens and San Luis/Monteverde campuses and communities.

The Adelante Award is given annually by consensus decision among the UGA Costa Rica Athens Office Staff and the UGA Costa Rica Campus Staff in review of all nominations.  Preference is given to individuals with demonstrated accomplishments in two or more of these areas.

Dr. Quint Newcomer’s Comments:

Kris has been highly engaged with UGA Costa Rica since very early on, even before I arrived. His first trip to UGA CR was in September 2003. He brought a group of 15 students and in-service teachers down to Costa Rica in March 2006 as part of an IDEAS Grant: “Environmental Education in Costa Rica: A UGA Service-Learning Experience” in which they interacted with faculty from the National University and the National Biodiversity Institute. They planted trees and learned about environmental education and Kris found his home away from home in San Luis. He then received a Scholarship of Engagement Grant and came back to UGA Costa Rica in 2009 to support community outreach activities in aquaculture pond management and to begin work on a service-learning toolkit to support faculty teaching at UGA Costa Rica. Based on the work completed in 2009, he was selected as a Senior Service-Learning Scholar to continue to develop the UGA Costa Rica Service-Learning Toolkit, which he completed in 2010. He has since helped with training several faculty to engage in service-learning as part of their education abroad programs with UGA Costa Rica. In 2010, we co-presented about service-learning at UGA Costa Rica at the “People, Place, & Partners: Building and Sustaining Engagement in Critical Times” Gulf-South Summit.

Kris Irwin Fishing

Since 2006, Kris has helped me write and submit at least seven funding proposals, including representing UGA for the annual WK Kellogg Foundation Community Engagement Award. Most recently, throughout 2013, Kris participated in the drafting of a white paper which led to the development of a large Coupled Natural and Human Systems grant we submitted to NSF. Our fingers remain crossed! In Fall 2011, Kris initiated contact with the US EPA International Office, and has helped foster an on-going dialog since that time with the team who serves as the advisors for the Central American region regarding high-level environmental policy planning and technical support. Together with Warnell colleague Jay Shelton, we have made four presentations to different EPA groups, at both Athens and Atlanta offices, regarding the work of UGA Costa Rica and possibilities of research collaborations with US EPA.

 In 2013, Kris and I launched a new spring break program, Tropical Reforestation, offering a hands-on service-learning field experience in support of the UGA Costa Rica carbon offset reforestation program. Enrollment more than doubled between 2013 to 2014. Kris supervised graduate student Micheal Heldreth in the development of a nursery management and tree monitoring protocol, which is helping us to standardize the management of the program and has been critical to help us begin to measure tree growth rates over time as well as gather other critical site data and develop detailed plotting and mapping for the 30,000 plus trees we have planted as part of this project.

Dr. Kris Irwin (center) with Dr. Jay Shelton (left) and Lucas Ramirez (right).
Dr. Kris Irwin (center) with Dr. Jay Shelton (left) and Lucas Ramirez (right).

 In addition to his engagement as an educator of students, as a researcher, and as a leader of community engagement and outreach, Kris has been a tireless champion of UGA Costa Rica, encouraging his colleagues to get involved, serving on the UGA Costa Rica Academic Advisory Board, and perhaps most importantly, he keeps me laughing when I most need a good dose of humor.

 I’ve told you many of the highlights of my work with Kris over the past 8 years. There’s equally as much I haven’t mentioned here. For his many, many contributions and steadfast support, the UGA Costa Rica Athens Office staff and Costa Rica Campus staff have unanimously selected Dr. Kris Irwin to receive the 2014 UGA Costa Rica Adelante Award.

Monday Top 5: UGACR Virtual Classroom Videos

This week we’re bringing you our favorite Virtual Classroom videos! These were produced by the extra special 2013 cohort of Resident Naturalists, with the technical expertise of photojournalism intern Kristy Densmore. Each video covers a different topic in a few short minutes. They are fun, educational,and proof that we have the best Resident Naturalists ever! Want to see more? You can also search “UGA Costa Rica Virtual Classroom” on Youtube or visit our page.

In this short video Freelance Naturalist Alexa Stickel tackles the subject of Nocturnal Predation.

2013 Resident Naturalist Alex Wright does an excellent job giving a brief Introduction to Interdependent Relationships.

Resident Naturalist Katie Lutz gives us tons of fun facts about The Cecropia Tree.

Water Quality Intern Marley Connor presents a great run-down of Water Quality in the Bellbird Biological Corridor.

Finally, Katie brings it home with a super cool lesson on Bats!

Well that’s all for now. Make sure you check out our Youtube account for more Virtual Classroom videos and for the other fun videos we post!

Monday Top 5: UGACR Instagram Pics

Some of you might not know this, but UGACR actually has an Instagram account where we post super awesome pictures! This week, however, we solicited your pictures. We have compiled our top five (in no particular order) #ugacostarica Instagram pictures to date! So enjoy and make sure to follow us to see more cool shots!

This first shot captures the easygoing feeling and the beauty of the campus.

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#chillin #UGACostaRica

Most of the shots we found were sky pics, but that’s no surprise with a sky as beautiful as this one!

katieblanc The bluest sky I've seen. Picture does no justice. #nofilter#costarica #uga #ugacostarica#puravida #blue #sky
katieblanc
The bluest sky I’ve seen. Picture does no justice. #nofilter#costarica #uga #ugacostarica#puravida #blue #sky

Life is never dull at UGACR.

christindotcom #tbt COSTA RICA 😜 #sofun#waterfalljump #rafting#adventure #jungle#ugacostarica #studyabroad#crazy #memories
christindotcom
#tbt COSTA RICA #sofun#waterfalljump #rafting#adventure #jungle#ugacostarica #studyabroad#crazy #memories

Who would’t be thankful for this lovely rainbow?

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Happy Thanksgiving from Costa Rica! #nofilter #UGACR #costarica#puravida #rainbow#monteverde #thankful

Although those are our top 5, we would like to add an honorable mention. This shot may not be a scenic view of campus, but it is one of our favorites because it expresses excitement to be involved in one of our programs. We are thrilled to have you too!

jdnmichelle GOT ACCEPTED TO THE#UGACOSTARICA STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM!!!! I cannot voice the amount of excitement exploding in my entire body.
jdnmichelle
GOT ACCEPTED TO THE#UGACOSTARICA STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM!!!! I cannot voice the amount of excitement exploding in my entire body.

That’s all for now! Make sure you follow us @ugacostarica for new pictures every day!